0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

1
Letter   |    
Detection of Attention Using Chaotic Global Features
Fahimeh Mamashli; Mehran Ahmadlu; M. Reza Hashemi Golpayegani; Shahriar Gharibzadeh
The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 2010;22:247.e20-247.e20. doi:02100139g

To the Editor: Attention as a selective gating mechanism is often compared to a spotlight, enhancing visual processes in the attended region of visual angle.1 The size of the attended region can be adjusted depending on the task, making attention similar to a zoom lens.2

Based on psychological studies, different types of attention (e.g., sustained attention, focused attention, selective attention, or internal attention) have been defined. Most of the EEG researchers have focused on frequency changes associated with different kinds of attentive tasks. For example, an increase in delta activity may be related to attention to internal processing during the performance of a mental task,3 alpha-synchronization has been found to be an important component of selective attention,4 and other studies show that EEG activity in the gamma range can be modulated by voluntary attention rather than involuntary capture of attention.5 In other words, no global feature exists to represent the attention during EEG recordings, and there is not any global feature to quantify all kinds of attention.

On the other hand, chaotic tools are best known for having global characteristics. In fact, a chaotic approach can extract global information to quantify attention better than the conventional local approaches. The known global features such as correlation dimension, fractal dimension, and Lyapunov exponent are suitable for this purpose. Since attention is directly related to neural synchronization,6 and these features also demonstrate synchronization, as the strength of attention increases, the amount of the global features decreases. So, in this way attentive state and its strength can be distinguished, regardless of its kind.

Based on above mentioned points, we hypothesize that chaotic tools rather than frequency approaches are suitable for studying attention in humans. Surely, experimental research is needed to validate our hypothesis.

.
Sagi D, Julesz B: Enhanced detection in the aperture of focal attention. Nature 1986; 321:693–695
 
.
Eriksen CW, St James JD: Visual attention within and around the field of focal attention: a zoom lens model. Percept Psychophys 1986; 40:225–240
 
.
Harmony T, Fernandez TF, Silva J, et al: EEG delta activity: an indicator of attention to internal processing during performance of mental tasks. Int J Psychophysiol 1996; 24:161–171
 
.
Rihs TA, Michel CM, Thut G: Mechanisms of selective inhibition in visual spatial attention are indexed by alpha-band EEG synchronization. Eur J Neurosci 2007; 25:603–610
 
.
Landau AN, Esterman M, Robertson LC, et al: Different effects of voluntary and involuntary attention on EEG activity in the gamma band. J Neurosci 2007; 27:11986–11990
 
.
Womelsdorf T, Fries P: The role of neuronal synchronization in selective attention. Curr Opin Neurobiol 2007; 17:154–160
 
+

References

.
Sagi D, Julesz B: Enhanced detection in the aperture of focal attention. Nature 1986; 321:693–695
 
.
Eriksen CW, St James JD: Visual attention within and around the field of focal attention: a zoom lens model. Percept Psychophys 1986; 40:225–240
 
.
Harmony T, Fernandez TF, Silva J, et al: EEG delta activity: an indicator of attention to internal processing during performance of mental tasks. Int J Psychophysiol 1996; 24:161–171
 
.
Rihs TA, Michel CM, Thut G: Mechanisms of selective inhibition in visual spatial attention are indexed by alpha-band EEG synchronization. Eur J Neurosci 2007; 25:603–610
 
.
Landau AN, Esterman M, Robertson LC, et al: Different effects of voluntary and involuntary attention on EEG activity in the gamma band. J Neurosci 2007; 27:11986–11990
 
.
Womelsdorf T, Fries P: The role of neuronal synchronization in selective attention. Curr Opin Neurobiol 2007; 17:154–160
 
+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Related Content
Books
Textbook of Psychotherapeutic Treatments > Chapter 18.  >
Textbook of Psychotherapeutic Treatments > Chapter 18.  >
Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th Edition > Chapter 54.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 39.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 0.  >
Psychiatric News