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Letters   |    
Tardive Dyskinesia Associated With Anastrozole
Narayana Manjunatha, M.D., D.P.M.; Sundarnag Ganjekar, M.D.; J. V. Mahendra, M.D., D.M.; Nalini Kilara, M.D., D.M.; R. Srinivasa, M.D., D.M.
The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 2013;25:E27-E28. doi:10.1176/appi.neuropsych.12060159
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Dept. of Psychiatry M.S. Ramaiah Medical College Bangalore, India
Dept. of Psychiatry M.S. Ramaiah Medical College Bangalore, India
Dept. of Neurology M.S. Ramaiah Medical College Bangalore, India
Dept. of Medical Oncology M.S. Ramaiah Medical College Bangalore, India
Dept. of Neurology M.S. Ramaiah Medical College Bangalore, India

Correspondence: manjunatha.adc@gmail.com

Copyright © 2013 American Psychiatric Association

Extract

To the Editor: Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is very well known side effect of typical antipsychotics. However, it is rarely reported with anti-cancer medication. We report a first journal case of TD in 48-year-old-woman who has been on anastrozole for the last 3 years for carcinoma of the breast. We postulate that the central aromatase inhibition of anastrozole leads the compensatory up-regulation of postsynaptic receptors, supporting the dopamine supersensitivity hypothesis of TD. Oncologists and neurologists should be aware of this side effect, which may occur with long-term use. We also suggest the inclusion of the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale to assess TD in all prospective clinical trials of anastrozole.

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