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Letters   |    
Post-ECT Hyperthermia and Rapid Mood Improvements: a Case Report
Anna Z. Antosik-Wojcinska, M.D.; Dorota Bzinkowska, M.D.; Lukasz Swiecicki, M.D., Ph.D.; Przemyslaw Bienkowski, M.D., Ph.D.
The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 2014;26:E21. doi:10.1176/appi.neuropsych.13020042
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The authors report no financial relationships with commercial interests.

Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland

Send correspondence to Dr. Bienkowski; e-mail: bienkow@ipin.edu.pl

Copyright © 2014 by the American Psychiatric Association

Extract

To the Editor: ECT is a safe and effective treatment for refractory major depression. Common side effects of ECT include headache, nausea, and mild memory impairment.1 ECT-associated hyperthermia has been rarely described.2,3

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References

Sienaert  P:  What we have learned about electroconvulsive therapy and its relevance for the practicing psychiatrist.  Can J Psychiatry 2011; 56:5–12
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Vilkin  MI:  Fever following electroshock.  Am J Psychiatry 1962; 118:946–947
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Bryson  EO;  Pasculli  RM;  Briggs  MC  et al:  Febrile reaction with elevated CPK after a single electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in an adolescent patient with severe bipolar disorder.  J ECT 2012; 28:70–71
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
Salerian  AJ;  Saleri  NG;  Salerian  JA:  Brain temperature may influence mood: a hypothesis.  Med Hypotheses 2008; 70:497–500
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
Bolwig TG: How does electroconvulsive therapy work? Theories on its mechanism.
 
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