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Letters   |    
Low-Dose Caffeine May Exacerbate Psychotic Symptoms in People With Schizophrenia
Po-Jui Peng, M.D.; Kuo-Tung Chiang, M.D.; Chih-Sung Liang, M.D.
The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 2014;26:E41. doi:10.1176/appi.neuropsych.13040098
View Author and Article Information

The authors report no financial relationships with commercial interests.

Dept. of Psychiatry, Beitou Branch, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

Dept. of Psychiatry, Beitou Armed Forces Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Dept. of Psychiatry, Beitou Branch, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

Send correspondence to Dr. Peng; e-mail: yippee0611@gmail.com

Copyright © 2014 by the American Psychiatric Association

Extract

To the Editor: Caffeine is a commonly used psychoactive drug worldwide, and current data point out high intake of caffeine in some people with schizophrenia.1 The popularity of caffeine is due to its stimulant properties, which might cause mental and behavioral effects. Caffeine could alter dopamine transmission that is secondary to antagonism of adenosine receptors and has been reported to induce psychotic symptoms after large intake of caffeine (at least 10 mg/kg) in persons with2 and without3 schizophrenia. We report a case of worsening psychosis in a 49-year-old man with schizophrenia being treated with flupenthixol decanoate injections after consuming relative low dose of caffeine. The psychosis resolved after ceasing caffeine intake without changing antipsychotic medication.

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References

Hughes  JR;  McHugh  P;  Holtzman  S:  Caffeine and schizophrenia.  Psychiatr Serv 1998; 49:1415–1417
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Cerimele  JM;  Stern  AP;  Jutras-Aswad  D:  Psychosis following excessive ingestion of energy drinks in a patient with schizophrenia.  Am J Psychiatry 2010; 167:353
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Hedges  DW;  Woon  FL;  Hoopes  SP:  Caffeine-induced psychosis.  CNS Spectr 2009; 14:127–129
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Gurpegui  M;  Aguilar  MC;  Martínez-Ortega  JM  et al:  Fewer but heavier caffeine consumers in schizophrenia: a case-control study.  Schizophr Res 2006; 86:276–283
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
Fisone  G;  Borgkvist  A;  Usiello  A:  Caffeine as a psychomotor stimulant: mechanism of action.  Cell Mol Life Sci 2004; 61:857–872
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
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